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Last week, the Death and Disease team were at the exact spot where 9000 Vikings first set foot on English soil before capturing the city of York.

The Vikings, led by King Harold III, camped at Stamford Bridge where they were attacked by another Harold – Kind Harold of England – and roundly defeated, with the Viking King dying from an arrow through his neck.

The victorious King Harold of England then marched to Hastings where he was famously defeated with an arrow through his eye.

Here at Death and Disease, we were getting a little confused with all the King Harolds dying of arrow wounds in battles in 1066. So we asked you to help us out by thinking up a new name for the Viking King Harold III who died with an arrow through his neck. Witty and to the point, your answers came flying out of the quarrel. Read on for the best of the bunch.

Kayleigh’s witty portmanteau “HarOUCH” had us smiling all week.

Julie came up with the clever with “Old Harking” while Barrie was more matter of fact about it with “Harold Neckerchief”.

PJ punted for Chelsea because of the Stamford Bridge connection.

James also considered a name in that vein, but felt it was more fitting for leaders who’d been stabbed in the back… He instead went for Erik the Rus after much consideration and reading up on Slavic history…

Jane told us that obviously, his real name was King Rowntree and he was able to capture York only because he tempted the people with the promise of a chocolate factory, that would one day exist and be named after him. We love your topsy-turvy take on history Jane!

Emily and Jean were among many who suggested “King ARROWED”, which we do adore.

But five stars and a smiley face has to go to Chris this week for King Strc Prst Skrz Krk – a Czech tongue twister that means “put your finger through your neck” – we’ll leave you to try to pronounce it!

THE WINNER

First out of the quiver this weeks is Carol “Harold III of Hastings” Atkinson. Congratulations! Please get in touch to claim your prize.

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